words caffeinated


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star 20/20

tumbling star
talk to me
answer the questions
that I’ve asked
shooting star
call to me
take me into
your loving grasp
falling star
cry with me
help me take
the pain away
sparking star
sing to me
tell me everything
will be okay

I wrote this 20 years ago when I was 20 years old.


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Conference Call Doodles

I endlessly doodle when on conference calls, which is way, way too much of my time. And then a few years ago I watched a TED Talk about how doodling actually increases our focus on what is being said. See here https://www.ted.com/talks/sunni_brown?language=en

Here are some of my conference call doodles. Anyone else a doodler?


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Blank Pages

Sometimes I leave pages in notebooks blank. One, two, three or eight. I think they must need to be that way. To not have words written on them. As if it were somehow just the way it should be.

And then, sometimes, in need of scratch paper to write down the date and time of a hair appointment, or to scribble a phone number, or maybe a grocery shopping list; I find these pages, tear them out.

I wonder, though, what happens to those empty spaces in the notebook that were meant to be there. Those pauses, those separations. I wonder if the words that were once apart by a single blank page then meet. If they say hello.


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Chocolate Lips

His tongue moved over his lips and I wondered if he could taste it– the sweetness.

As if his words were fading in and out, the world moved in jagged slow motions, as I stared at his lips– full and beautiful and chocolate stained.

“Here’s a napkin,” I told him abruptly.

He smiled, held it in his hand and continued speaking. Innocent, boyish.

“There’s chocolate on your mouth,” I finally said.

Startled, he wiped his mouth with the napkin. Even still, on the edge of his bottom lip, a small smudge remained.

“Is it gone?” he asks me.

“Yes. It’s gone.”


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Putting the Shoes Nicely

My 5 year old daughter has the job of “putting the shoes nicely”. When I first told her to do this, I explained, “Put the shoes nicely,” while in a rush and nothing more.

Since then, she’s been going about finding shoes that have been randomly left throughout the house– by the door, in the middle of the front room, under the kitchen table, and puts them so that they are side by side; left shoe on the left, right shoe on the right. The only problem here is, she leaves them exactly where they were.

Instead of having random shoes strewn about, we now have nicely placed shoes in odd places.

I haven’t had the heart to tell her the shoes should be taken to the place I’ve designated shoes are to be left. Maybe I liked the quirkiness of shoes nicely placed throughout the house, or maybe I simply decided it wasn’t worth the time.

Today, though, I let her know that “putting the shoes nicely” meant you also put them by the door where they should be.

Her response?

“They don’t look nice there!”

And you know, I can’t really argue with that.